Lineage and Early Days | #WhoIsMuhammad PBUH

Allahuma-Sali-ala-sayidna-Muhammad-was-salim

PART 2

LINEAGE AND EARLY DAYS

The prophet peace be upon him belonged to the Hashemite family, named after his great grandfather Hashim Bin Abd Manaf. Banu Hashim was responsible for giving food and water to the pilgrims. The responsibility of feeding the pilgrims was passed on to the prophet’s grandfather, Abdul Muttalib. He is famous for restoring the well of Zamzam from which thousands of pilgrims drank. This became a tradition and to this day millions of pilgrims enjoy its fresh water. The Prophet’s father Abdullah was the smartest and most loved son of Abdul Muttalib. He was married to Aminah, daughter of a prominent chief of Banu Zahra. Abdullah died while he was returning from a trade journey from Syria in Madinah at the age of 25.

The Prophet peace be upon him was born on the 9th of Rabi ul Awwal in the year of Elephant (The incident when Abraha, king of Yemen marched to Makkah to bring down the Ka’abah on an Elephant). He was named Mohammad which was a very rare name amongst the Arabs by his grandfather.

It was a common Arab custom to send children to Bedouin nurses for their upbringing in a clean and healthy environment. The prophet peace be upon him was entrusted to Halimah Bint Abi Dhuaib. The Prophet stayed with her for around four or five years. Halimah grew worried about the prophet peace be upon him after the incident of the opening of his chest by angel Jibreel.

It was narrated from Anas ibn Malik (may Allah be pleased with him) that that Jibreel came to the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) when he was playing with the other boys. He took hold of him and threw him to the ground, then he opened his chest and took out his heart, from which he took a clot of blood and said: “This was the Satan’s share of you.” Then he washed it in a vessel of gold that was filled with Zamzam. Then he put it back together and returned it to its place. The boys went running to his mother – meaning his nurse – and said: Muhammad has been killed! They went to him and his color had changed. Anas said: I used to see the mark of that stitching on his chest.

Narrated by Muslim (162).

She decided to give him back to his mother after the incident.

Aminah took the prophet peace be upon him to Madinah to visit her husband’s grave. She died on their way back to Makkah. Thus, Mohammad peace be upon him lost both his parents at the tender age of six.

His grandfather Abdul Muttalib took him in his care. He loved the Prophet with all his heart. He would favor the prophet over his own sons. Sadly, he too passed away when the prophet peace be upon him was eight years old. Abu Talib, the uncle of the Prophet peace be upon him took him in after the demise of his father (Abdul Muttalib).

When the Prophet peace be upon him turned twelve, he accompanied Abu Talib on a trade journey to Syria. Bahira, a monk came to meet the caravan when they reached Busra. He recognized the Prophet and said while taking his hand:

“This is the master of all humans. Allah will send him with a Message which will be a mercy to all beings.”

Abu Talib asked: “How do you know that?”

He replied: “When you appeared from the direction of ‘Aqabah, all stones and trees prostrated themselves, which they never do except for a Prophet. I can recognize him also by the seal of Prophet hood which is below his shoulder, like an apple. We have found this in our books.”

He also asked Abu Talib to send the boy back to Makkah and not to take him to Syria for fear of the Romans and Jews. Abu Talib obeyed and sent him back to Makkah with some of his men servants.

(At-Tirmidhi no.3620)

It is reported that the prophet peace be upon him worked as a shepherd in his early youth. Herding sheep has been a famous occupation for many prophets. This gave the Prophet peace be upon him time to ponder upon his surroundings, the celestial bodies, the desert and other creations.

 

Bibliography

Al-mubarakpuri, S.2008. The Sealed Nectar. Darussalam, second edition.

 

 

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13 thoughts on “Lineage and Early Days | #WhoIsMuhammad PBUH

  1. Nepolean Bonaparte – Quoted in Christian Cherfils BONAPARTE ET ISLAM (PARIS  1914)

    “I hope the time is not far off when I shall be able to unite all the wise and educated men of all the countries and establish a uniform regime based on the principles of Qur’an which alone are true and which alone can lead men to happiness.”

     

    M.K.Gandhi, YOUNG INDIA, 1924

    “…I became more than ever convinced that it was not the sword that won a place for Islam in those days in the scheme of life. It was the rigid simplicity, the utter self-effacement of the prophet, the scrupulous regard for his pledges, his intense devotion to his friends and followers, his intrepidity, his fearlessness, his absolute trust in God and his own mission. These, and not the sword carried everything before them and surmounted every trouble.” YOUNG INDIA, 1924

     

    Lamartine – Histoire de la Turquie, Paris 1854, Vol II, pp. 276-77:

    “If greatness of purpose, smallness of means, and astounding results are the three criteria of human genius, who could dare to compare any great man in modern history with Muhammad? The most famous men created arms, laws and empires only. They founded, if anything at all, no more than material powers which often crumbled away before their eyes. This man moved not only armies, legislations, empires, peoples and dynasties, but millions of men in one-third of the then inhabited world; and more than that, he moved the altars, the gods, the religions, the ideas, the beliefs and souls… the forbearance in victory, his ambition, which was entirely devoted to one idea and in no manner striving for an empire; his endless prayers, his mystic conversations with God, his death and his triumph after death; all these attest not to an imposture but to a firm conviction which gave him the power to restore a dogma. This dogma was twofold, the unit of God and the immateriality of God; the former telling what God is, the latter telling what God is not; the one overthrowing false gods with the sword, the other starting an idea with words.

    “Philosopher, orator, apostle, legislator, warrior, conqueror of ideas, restorer of rational dogmas, of a cult without images; the founder of twenty terrestrial empires and of one spiritual empire, that is Muhammad. As regards all standards by which human greatness may be measured, we may well ask, is there any man greater than he?”

     

    Edward Gibbon and Simon Ocklay  – History of the Saracen Empire, London, 1870, p. 54:

    “It is not the propagation but the permanency of his religion that deserves our wonder, the same pure and perfect impression which he engraved at Mecca and Medina is preserved, after the revolutions of twelve centuries by the Indian, the African and the Turkish proselytes of the Koran…The Mahometans have uniformly withstood the temptation of reducing the object of their faith and devotion to a level with the senses and imagination of man. ‘I believe in One God and Mahomet the Apostle of God’, is the simple and invariable profession of Islam. The intellectual image of the Deity has never been degraded by any visible idol; the honors of the prophet have never transgressed the measure of human virtue, and his living precepts have restrained the gratitude of his disciples within the bounds of reason and religion.”

     

    Rev. Bosworth Smith, Mohammed and Mohammadanism, London 1874, p. 92:

    “He was Caesar and Pope in one; but he was Pope without Pope’s pretensions, Caesar without the legions of Caesar: without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without a palace, without a fixed revenue; if ever any man had the right to say that he ruled by the right divine, it was Mohammed, for he had all the power without its instruments and without its supports.”

     

    Annie Besant, The Life and Teachings of Muhammad, Madras 1932, p. 4:

    “It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia, who knows how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for that mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel whenever I re-read them, a new way of admiration, a new sense of reverence for that mighty Arabian teacher.”

     

    Montgomery Watt, Mohammad at Mecca, Oxford 1953, p. 52:

    “His readiness to undergo persecutions for his beliefs, the high moral character of the men who believed in him and looked up to him as leader, and the greatness of his ultimate achievement – all argue his fundamental integrity. To suppose Muhammad an impostor raises more problems than it solves. Moreover, none of the great figures of history is so poorly appreciated in the West as Muhammad.”

     

    James A. Michener, ‘Islam: The Misunderstood Religion’ in Reader’s Digest (American Edition), May 1955, pp. 68-70:

    “Muhammad, the inspired man who founded Islam, was born about A.D. 570 into an Arabian tribe that worshipped idols. Orphaned at birth, he was always particularly solicitous of the poor and needy, the widow and the orphan, the slave and the downtrodden. At twenty he was already a successful businessman, and soon became director of camel caravans for a wealthy widow. When he reached twenty-five, his employer, recognizing his merit, proposed marriage. Even though she was fifteen years older, he married her, and as long as she lived, remained a devoted husband.

    “Like almost every major prophet before him, Muhammad fought shy of serving as the transmitter of God’s word, sensing his own inadequacy. But the angel commanded ‘Read’. So far as we know, Muhammad was unable to read or write, but he began to dictate those inspired words which would soon revolutionize a large segment of the earth: “There is one God.”

    “In all things Muhammad was profoundly practical. When his beloved son Ibrahim died, an eclipse occurred, and rumors of God’s personal condolence quickly arose. Whereupon Muhammad is said to have announced, ‘An eclipse is a phenomenon of nature. It is foolish to attribute such things to the death or birth of a human-being.’

    “At Muhammad’s own death an attempt was made to deify him, but the man who was to become his administrative successor killed the hysteria with one of the noblest speeches in religious history: ‘If there are any among you who worshipped Muhammad, he is dead. But if it is God you worshipped, He lives forever.'”

     

    Michael H. Hart, The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History, New York: Hart Publishing Company, Inc. 1978, p. 33:

    “My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the world’s most influential persons may surprise some readers and may be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular level.”

    Sarojini Naidu, the famous Indian poetess says – S. Naidu, Ideals of Islam, Speeches and Writings, Madaras, 1918

    “It was the first religion that preached and practiced democracy; for, in the mosque, when the call for prayer is sounded and worshippers are gathered together, the democracy of Islam is embodied five times a day when the peasant and king kneel side by side and proclaim: ‘God Alone is Great’… “

     

    Thomas Caryle – Heros and Heros Worship

    “how one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decades?”
    “…The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammed) are disgraceful to ourselves only…How one man single-handedly, could weld warring tribes and wandering Bedouins into a most powerful and civilized nation in less than two decades….A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest. He was to kindle the world; the world’s Maker had ordered so.”

     

    Stanley Lane-Poole – Table Talk of the Prophet

    “He was the most faithful protector of those he protected, the sweetest and most agreeable in conversation. Those who saw him were suddenly filled with reverence; those who came near him loved him; they who described him would say, “I have never seen his like either before or after.” He was of great taciturnity, but when he spoke it was with emphasis and deliberation, and no one could forget what he said…”

     

    George Bernard Shaw – The Genuine Islam Vol.No.8, 1936.

    “I believe if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring much needed peace and happiness.
    I have studied him – the man and in my opinion is far from being an anti–Christ. He must be called the Savior of Humanity.
    I have prophesied about the faith of Mohammad that it would be acceptable the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today.”

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  2. Pingback: WHO IS MOHAMMAD PEACE BE UPON HIM? | Dpressedmuslimah

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